We use cookies to improve your experience on this website. Allow Cookies Read More
Home »

Wind Industry Calls for New schemes to Encourage Further Wind Microgeneration on Irish Farms

09 October, 2014


Electricity costs amongst main overheads for farming communities

• Step-by-Step Guide Launched to Support Wind Microgeneration for Farms, Families and Small businesses


9th October, 2014 - The Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA) has called on the Government to introduce new schemes that would further encourage and incentivise the development of wind microgeneration in Ireland and on Irish farms, which the Association maintains could have significant benefits to farmers and the farming industry.

Microgeneration is the production of energy on a small scale for farms, businesses or domestic homes. Typical microgeneration technologies include Wind Turbines, Solar Photovoltaic, Hydro Power and Combined Heat & Power (CHP) with equipment ratings below 11kW.

Speaking in advance of IWEA’s annual conference in Kilkenny, Caitriona Diviney, Chief Operations Officer of IWEA says that electricity costs rank among the main overheads for Irish farmers and that more wind microgeneration could help reduce costs, whilst allowing farmers to earn additional income by contributing the surplus electricity from their farms to the national grid. On Irish dairy farms alone research from Teagasc has shown that electricity usage contributes on average, 0.49 cent/litre to milk production costs.

“When compared to neighbouring countries such as the UK, the significant potential for wind microgeneration in Ireland still remains relatively untapped. Locally generated electricity can be yet another guaranteed Irish farm product, and can give farmers more control over their own electricity production."

“We believe greater wind microgeneration can lead to more sustainable livelihoods on Irish farms and form part of the solution to reduce the overall carbon emissions of the industry."


To encourage the development of wind microgeneration, Diviney believes that new schemes could be put in place to give farmers greater opportunity to invest in this technology.

“Some farmers are already successfully availing of microgeneration and it is recognised as a long term investment however under current circumstances economic payback for a micro-scale wind turbine may not be achieved for more than ten years. In our pre-budget submission to the Government we have therefore, called for new schemes, akin to those in other countries, that could reduce the payback period, making this a much more attractive option for farmers but also for suitable small businesses and some residential homes.”

The Irish Wind Energy Association has launched a step-by-step guide aimed at helping farmers consider the options in availing of new microgeneration technology and is available for download on their website.

“Although we believe more needs to be done to encourage wind microgeneration, we are delighted to launch this step-by-step guide which will help those interested in adopting the new technology which would result in more sustainable energy practices among Irish farmers,” added Diviney.

The Irish Wind Energy Association is the national body representing the wind energy sector in Ireland. IWEA is committed to promoting the use of wind energy in Ireland and beyond as an economically viable and environmentally sound alternative to conventional generation and promotes awareness and understanding of wind power as the primary renewable energy resource.

Ends

Notes to Editor:

The full text of the new IWEA ‘Wind Microgeneration Step by Step Guide’ is available for download on the IWEA website at www.iwea.com/industryreports .

For more information:
Ben Valdimarsson
ReputationInc
Tel: 01 4120512
 

About IWEA

Established in 1993, the Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA) is the national body representing the wind energy sector in Ireland. IWEA is committed to promoting the use of wind energy in Ireland and beyond as an economically viable and environmentally sound alternative to conventional generation and promotes awareness and understanding of wind power as the primary renewable energy resource. IWEA is also dedicated to education and awareness building, and to building the skills base of the renewable energy sector in Ireland. IWEA also supports the development of other renewable technology, particularly marine energy. IWEA has more than 200 members who incorporate all leading industry voices in Ireland. IWEA acts as a central point for information for its membership as well as a voice to promote wind energy to government. IWEA is entirely self-funded and relies on the support of its members.

For more information, please visit http://www.iwea.com

404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /cfm/banner4.jpg was not found on this server.